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Starting with the 2007 model year, Nissan will be making changes to its line up which will ultimately mean that the Maxima will be redesigned, equipped with more standard equipment, and cost you more. You can thank Toyota's Avalon, in part, for this change.

Nissans Pending Up Market Push

Nissans Pending Up Market PushThe Nissan Motor Company is quietly working on a campaign to overhaul their car line up. Current models, including the Maxima, Altima, and Sentra, soon will be transformed into more luxurious and expensive models while a new car line, the Versa, is welcomed into the fold and sold as the automakers introductory model. So, why this change for Nissan? Will the automakers plans succeed or fail? A lot is hinging on this move by Nissan, perhaps more than meets the eye.The Nissan motor division has been a good performer in the highly competitive US auto market. With the transformation of the makes name from Datsun to Nissan in the early 1980s to the introduction of a luxury line, Infiniti, in the late 1980s, the Nissan Motor Company has benefited financially and its customers have been receptive to the changes. Still, Nissans line is a perennial third place finisher among Japanese automakers in the lucrative U.S. auto market, easily being outperformed and outsold by Toyota and Honda year in and year out.The pending changes for Nissans line up are coming about and for the following reasons:1.The Maximas competition, the Toyota Avalon, was overhauled for the 2006 model year. The Avalon has shed its frumpy image as it borrows Lexus styling cues to give it a much more luxurious and appealing look. An improved interior and more standard equipment has pushed a fully loaded Avalon into the low to mid-30s range as well. Nissans response to Toyotas move is to Infinitize the Maxima starting with the 2007 model year by giving it a more luxurious edge to compete effectively with the Avalon.2.Introduction of the Versa. To fight Toyotas budget minded, youth friendly Scion division, Nissan will be importing the Versa -- a 1.8L 4 cylinder powered xA-competing hatchback -- expected to retail at about $12,000. To make way for the new introductory level car, both the Sentra and Altima get a slight push up market, not as noticeable as the Maximas bump up, but enough to distinguish these two lines from each other and from the Versa.Of course, Nissan wont be selling the Maxima, Altima, or Sentra for less than what you pay for these cars now. In fact, the Maximas price may ultimately surge several thousand dollars and into the range of cars sold by their Infiniti division which begs the following question: why purchase a Maxima when an Infiniti G35 could be had for almost the same price?At the same time, both the Altima and Sentra risk being undercut price wise by American and Korean manufacturers hungry to carve out a greater share of the market. Indeed, the all new Alabama-built Hyundai Sonata should sell for several thousand dollars less than a comparatively equipped Altima. With Hyundais quality levels improving, the Sonatas appeal rises measurably.Ultimately, Nissan must keep pace with Toyota and Honda or risk being marginalized further. With other manufacturers duking it out, it will be interesting to see if higher prices hold for Nissan models or whether the Japanese automaker will be forced to cut prices to win consumers and to hold onto market share.

How to lose $20,000 selling your car on-line

How to lose $20,000 selling your car on-line

You have your car listed for sale on the Internet and it looks like you have an easy sale. The emails are rolling in from interested buyers. But wait, a lot of these interested buyer may have a plan that will take a lot of your hard earned money.Because we get into the details, there are four rules that you must follow not matter what. If you violate either of these rules you will lose your money:1) Never accept payment which is not for the exact amount of the sale.2) Do not assume that any cashier check or money order is valid.3) Do not assume any payment if valid just because your bank gives you cash for it.4) Another persons problem is not your problem to solve.Before I explain these simple rules we will look at two actual emails I received from people wanting to buy my used car. I listed a price above market value as an experiment and did not believe anyone would answer my ad.Both of these emails had IP addresses from outside the USA. In the first one an address and phone in the USA were given. You cannot rely on IP address, phones or postal addresses for identification of where a purchase is actually from.First email:HELLO,INQUIRY ON YOUR CAR, PLEASE GET BACK TO ME WITH YOUR ROCK BOTTOM ASKING PRICE AND THE PICTURES IF THE CAR IS STILL AVAILABLE.HAVE A NICE DAYJAMES THOMAS[address][phone]In response, I answered using an almost obscene name and told him the car was as described on the web and gave him a price that was higher than what I stated on the web.If you notice he does not really ask any questions about the car. You can be pretty sure he emails the same email to thousands of people and cannot remember which email is about which car.Mr. "Thomas" replies:HELLO,THANKS FOR YOUR URGENT RESPONCE, HOPE ALL IS WELL WITH YOU. AFTER CONSIDERING THE PRICE, I HAVE ACCEPTED MAKING PAYMENT FOR THE CAR. BUT THE ISSUE IS THAT I HAVE A FRIEND WHO IS OWING ME HE WORKS WITH INTER TRUST FINANCIAL IN CANADA BUT HE IS PRESENTLY ON VACATION IN SAUDI ARABIA. I HAVE CONSIDERED USING THE MONEY ON THIS TRANSACTION, SO HE WILL BE MAKING THE PAYMENT DIRECTLY TO YOU WITH A CASHIERS CHECK, BUT THE MONEY IS IN EXCESS OF THE PRICE OF THE CAR, SINCE WE HAVE AGREED ON US$15, 100 FOR THE PRICE, SO YOU HAVE TO SEND THE EXCESS TO THE AGENT THAT WILL COME FOR THE PICK UP SO THAT HE CAN BE ABLE TO OFFSET SHIPPING CHARGES. THEREFORE, I URGE YOU TO PROVIDE YOUR MAILLING INFORMATION WHICH ARE YOUR LEGAL NAME, HOME ADDRESS, AND PHONE NUMBER SO THAT HE CAN BE ABLE TO MAIL THE CASHIERS CHECK TO YOU VIA COURIER SERVICE. AND ALSO YOU ARE TO STATE THE PRESENT LOCATION OF THE CAR FOR EASY PICK-UP.THANKS AS I WAIT TO RECIEVE YOUR CONSENT ON THIS TRANSACTION SOON.THANKS AND GOD BLESSJAMES THOMASHere comes the problem. To sell my car to Mr. "Thomas" I will need to violate all four rules I listed above. The bottom line is that Mr. "Thomas" will send me a cashiers for more than the amount of the sale, the bank will give me cash the day after I deposit the cashiers check, I will refund the extra to him (I am not "solving" his "problems"). My surprise will be that in a month or so, my bank will tell me the cashiers check was forged and remove the full amount from my back account; but I have already refunded the extra to Mr. "Thomas" so my bank balance will likely end up well below zero!If I am lucky, I will be out the $5, 000 and find out before I actually sign the title of my car over to Mr. "Thomas"!Here is another email which is basically the same. Again, they are not interested in any details of the car, though some scam emails do ask a few questions. They do not specifically mention a cashiers check, but instead refer to a "check payable in the US". The email also implies that the car will need to be shipped to a client. I will not comment on his horrible spelling.Hello,my clinet is intrested in your car..if is still avalebbile please contact me. which you will receive a payable check in U.S. Hope to read from you soon.Regards.markWe should add an additional rule, if you are not a professional in the import, export business, do not think about shipping your car overseas. Not for one second. Not even if the "buyer" has arranged for shipping. Even if it were legitimate (and it is not) you would be in for more headaches that you want.We need to review the 4 simple rules again:1) Never accept payment which is not for the exact amount of the sale.Any normal purchaser will make payment to you in the correct amount. If someone has a check for the "wrong" amount it is not your problem to resolve. You are just trying to sell a car, your are not in the banking business! Really you should be selling your car to someone you see in person with cash or a check from a local bank you can verify at their bank.2) Do not assume that any cashier check or money order is valid.The FDIC issues regular reports about stolen and forged money orders and cashiers checks. It is not a rare event. You cannot assume any payment is valid unless you personally verify it at the bank that issued the payment, ie: by walking into that bank and cashing it.3) Do not assume any payment if valid just because your bank gives you cash for it.Under U.S. Banking Laws, your bank is obligated to "clear" cashiers checks in one business day. That means if you deposit a cashiers check today, your bank must allow you to withdraw cash tomorrow. That does not mean the payment is good. A forged cashiers check can take weeks for your bank to discover. When they do the entire amount plus service charges will be removed from your account! You see the trick?4) Another persons problem is not your problem to solve.Many of these scamsters develop involved stories about all kinds of problems they have, in this case a cashiers check for too much money. They offer you a bonus or easy sale for helping them solve the problem. In reality the only problem is that you will lose lots of money trying to "help" them.Your only problem is to sell your car to an actual buyer, that has actually looked at the car and makes a payment you can actually verify (cash) at their bank. This will never include someone that wants the car shipped somewhere. It will never include someone that has a check of any kind for too much money.No one will ever pay you an extra $500 much less an extra $1,000 or $5,000 for your car for helping them.BOTTOM LINE Do not ever involve the "problems" of someone else in your transaction. Do not accept any "cashiers check" as valid -- no matter what the teller at your bank says.The real question is who would buy a car they do not look at? But if you must sell your car to someone who is not local, please make sure you use an escrow service.

Is Your Cars Brake Light Stuck?

Is Your Cars Brake Light Stuck?

When your brake light seems to be always on, then you might want to check it. You see, your cars brake light may be stuck. You should first check the brake pedal switch. If you do not know where to find this, it is actually that small button that you can find behind the brake pedal. When you press the brake pedal down, this button is actually activated and makes your brake lights go on. Try checking the switch manually. If this seems to be the problem, then you can try giving it more force for it to become unstuck and solve the brake light problem. Or you can check other parts of your brake system to see which one might be the culprit for your cars eternally on brake light. You can check the fuse of the brake light and see if there are any damages to it. Also check the light bulbs of the brake light itself. If you simply are stumped, you can bring your car to your trusted mechanic so he himself can diagnose the problem for you. And when he does, he also could expertly find the solution so as to get rid of your brake light problem. So why is it important to fix your cars brake light problem? Well, according to automobile experts, when you drive around in a car that has brake lights that do not work perfectly, you are increasing your chances of being in an accident or even of being the cause of other motorists accidents. That certainly would not be something you would not like to be caught in the middle of. Your brake lights are there not just for aesthetic purposes. They serve as a signal for other motorists on what you are doing. These brake lights also send out information to other drivers that you are slowing down or are doing to stop your vehicle.

Diesel Powered Cars: Coming At You!

Diesel Powered Cars: Coming At You!

The number of diesel powered cars on North American highways has been dropping steadily ever since their peak in the mid 1980s. For many motorists, diesel engines conjure up images of pollution, poor power, and unreliability. However, one generation later and all that is about to change. New diesel powered vehicles will soon be arriving, in fact one is already here and receiving critical acclaim from auto enthusiasts.Who can forget those diesel powered Chevrolet Caprices and Oldsmobile 98s that suddenly became very popular 25 years ago? If you are like many car owners, you want to forget those cars. What GM did back then was to take existing gasoline engines and convert them to "diesel engines" . These converted engines were loud, smoky, and very unreliable. They were unreliable to the point where GM had to pay tens of millions of dollars to replace failed engines with gasoline engines.The memory of GMs diesel fiasco was never lost on drivers who have spurned diesels to the point where many automakers are no longer producing diesel engines. Mercedes, a strong seller of diesel powered cars in Europe, no longer sells a diesel powered car in North America. VW is the lone importer of diesel engines while the U.S. manufacturers only place high performance diesel engines in their larger vehicles such as pick up trucks.Another area that has stopped diesel engines cold is air pollution. Very stringent emission regulations have all but wiped out the possibility that many of the smaller diesel engines could be sold in the U.S. However, a change is in the wind as new technology is now in place that will make diesel powered cars cleaner. In addition, with the high cost of gasoline now prevailing, a diesel powered car has much more of an appeal to it especially since fuel savings of 20-30% are possible.DaimlerChrysler recently introduced a Jeep Liberty with an optionally equipped diesel engine and this compact SUV is selling well with the optional engine. Its new 2.8L diesel delivers fuel improvements as high as 32% over a comparable gas 4x4 model and pollution is kept to a minimum. In addition, the added torque is a favorite with some, especially those who need to pull a boat or a camper with the Jeep.Volkswagen will be bringing additional diesel powered cars to the North American market over the next few years. Diesel powered Golfs, Jettas, and possibly several larger model VWs will soon be traversing the highways and byways of Canada and the U.S.BMW and Mercedes are both likely to be importing diesel cars over the next few years. Both automakers are studying the market to see if compact models could sell in North America. Each proposed model line is currently sold in Europe and diesel engines are a popular option with these cars.GM is also considering tapping its relationship with Isuzu to import engines to be placed in several compact models. Long a producer of diesel powered vehicles, Isuzu has pretty much exited the North American market, but could return in the form of Isuzu powered cars sold by GM.Chrysler will likely take its favorable experience with its Jeep division and begin to offer diesel engines on other trucks and SUVs. At the same time the all new Dodge Caliber, a replacement for the Neon, may eventually offer a diesel engine too.Ford seems to be content with expanding its hybrid offerings and no other Japanese or Korean manufacturers appear ready to jump into the diesel movementyet. Regardless, within five years the number of diesel cars on American and Canadian roads will likely triple. This can be a good thing for people wanting better fuel mileage, more torque, and a highly reliable engine.For older diesel powered cars, they will continue to serve their purpose as owners discover how to extend their lives through useful aftermarket parts such as Bully Dog and competing products. With their rugged durability and well known reliability, a diesel powered car can easily reach a half of million miles or more before quitting.

Pssst: Wanna (not) Buy a Stolen Car?

Would you buy a used car--with cash--from someone you just met in the bar, and who walked you down a dark alley to show you the car? Not likely. How about from a well-dressed, friendly, middle-aged man or woman, who placed a classified ad in your local newspaper, and who meets you midday at a restaurant of your choice? Oops! You may be more likely to be cheated by seller number two. That's the story of Jennifer Warwa, who bought a minivan and had her mechanic examine it. The mechanic later said how shocked he was that Jennifer had been scammed: "Because I met the gentleman who was selling the vehicle. Very clean cut. In his fifties. Very soft spoken.... And he went with her to get it inspected. There was just no sign that was the kind of person he was" the mechanic told CBC's Marketplace. A few months later, Jennifer got a phone call from the police. They said she had purchased a stolen minivan, and they were coming to seize it. She was so upset, she tried to hide the van from the police. Eventually they caught up with her and she ended up paying for a year and a half for a $5,000 bank loan on a van she could not drive. Ouch! Jennifer was just one victim in the chain that included the original owner, the insurance company, other consumers whose insurance rates keep rising, and the police, who spend thousands of hours tracking thefts. According to the FBI, a vehicle is stolen about every 25 seconds in the USA, amounting to an $8 billion yearly problem. Here's how these scams often work. Thieves target particular cars: for their value, their ease of resale as a whole or in parts, or because they are easier to steal. Years ago, most cars were stripped for parts, including unusual parts such as airbags. But today some thieves are so brash they sell cars through newspapers. This newer scam is called "VIN cloning", because the Vehicle Identification Number is stolen from another car. Criminals obtain VINs by copying them from the dash of cars in parking lots--even at dealerships. Some even physically remove the VIN plate from vehicles in auto salvage yards that allow customers to "pick your own parts." (They do not mean that literally!) The number is used to falsely obtain new ownership documents, or documents are forged. Either way, a cloned VIN allows them to transform stolen cars into pseudo-legal vehicles that can be officially titled and sold. Many thieves work across state lines: cars may be stolen in the East, registered in the Mid-West, then sold in California. Scary! Here's what you can do to avoid buying a stolen car:** Check the VIN on the dash against the VIN in the driver's door jamb, under the hood, and on the paperwork** Use the VIN to get the car's history at carfax.com for about $20** Ensure title and registration documents match the name and address of the seller** Is the car from out of state?** Be suspicious if you must meet a private seller in a parking lot. Better to see that they live at the address where the car is registered** Has the vehicle recently been transferred?** Does the seller use a home or work phone number, or just a cell?** Is the selling price oddly low?** Be warned that some used car dealers are getting scammed, too** Pay by certified cheque or money order, not cash.Keep in mind that most private sellers are not thieves, but rather honest, regular folks like you. And prices do tend to be lower with private sales. So if you follow my advice, you can greatly improve your chances of driving away with a "genuine" used car.

Get A Top Notch Used Car

It doesnt have to be a hard task to buy a second hand car. Knowing what youre doing of course helps quite a bit. So read and following these following tips on inspecting a used car, for you never know when they will come in handy. Fits you should inspect the exterior of the vehicle. Look at the condition of the paint. If you notice that it could be new paint, which can you a clue that the vehicle might have been in an accident. Which is not such a good thing, also be on the look out for any rust on the exterior of the car. When inspecting the exterior look to see if the vehicle is leveled. If it looks like it sags to one side it could mean the frame or spring is damaged. Also check out the tires, see if their in good condition and inflated. Then check to see if all the lights, blinkers and tail light all work and are not damaged. Finally take a look at all the other exterior parts such as the disc brakes, mirrors, glass, wheel rims etc. The second step would be to check out the interior of the vehicle. First off, check to see if there are any unusually odors. It might be hard to remove an unpleasant odor. Make sure you can tolerate the smell of the car. Look at the condition of the interior, look at how stained or well kept it is. Finally check to see if all the mechanical controls are working. Check the seats, windows, radio, windshield wiper and seat belt controls, you want to make sure that everything works and is in good condition. The trunk is also something that you take a look at. It is probably the most over looked. You should see any signs of rust or water due to cracks or holes. The last but no least is checking under the hood. Even if you dont know very much about whats under hood you still be able to check for signs of damage, like rust or dents. You can always have a mechanic come and inspect under the hood. If it all seems to look good then the last thing would be to take it for a test drive. Pay attention to how it handles the road and how it sounds. Make sure you feel comfortable and safe while driving the vehicle. Dont buy the car if you hear any unusually noises, that is never a good sign. There are many options out there you dont need to settle for anything. You can get the good quality used car that you want.

Summary

Starting with the 2007 model year, Nissan will be making changes to its line up which will ultimately mean that the Maxima will be redesigned, equipped with more standard equipment, and cost you more. You can thank Toyota's Avalon, in part, for this change.